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BlogArizona.com - the ORIGINAL Arizona Real Estate Blog
BlogArizona.com offers discussions on a wide variety of subjects, but focuses on Arizona and real estate.  The articles  posted here are contributed by various working professionals.  Their insights and experiences will inform, educate, challenge and entertain our readers week after week.  Some of the best reading on blogs often comes from reader Comments!  We encourage you to use the 'Comments' feature to join discussions and interact with both our Contributors, and our other readers.  We do require that you first review and accept our 'Comment Rules' in order to preserve the quality and integrity of this blog.  Also be aware that all visitors are subject to our Terms of Use.

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BlogArizona Category: Real Estate Contracts & Issues

This page contains all BlogArizona posts related to Real Estate Contracts & Issues.   Read a specific post by clicking on a title below, or scroll further down the page to read through all posts in this category.
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  • Thursday, August 16, 2012

    Beware of Mortgage Modification & Foreclosure Assistance Scams

    If you or someone you know is trying to do a mortgage modification or seeking help for a foreclosure situation, be sure to read this announcement from Arizona Attorney General Tom Horne:

    AG Horne Files Two Lawsuits Against Mortgage Modification Assistance Companies Operating In Both Phoenix and Tucson

    PHOENIX (Wednesday, August 15, 2012) -- Attorney General Horne announced today two lawsuits have been filed against Arizona companies selling mortgage modification services to distressed homeowners.

    “There is still a significant amount of fallout from the mortgage crisis, and consumers need to remain vigilant when approached about mortgage modification services,” Horne said. “The legal actions that have been filed serve as a reminder that people need to be very careful about dealing only with reputable servicers.”

    The lawsuits are against Phoenix based Making All Homes Affordable, LLC (“MAHA”) and its owner Albert Figueroa and Tucson based La Paz Source, LLC, its owners, Defendant Maria Beltran and her husband, Defendant Francisco Ramos and their new operation La Placita Multi Services, LLC owned and operated by Beltran and an individual named Arturo Gomez Leon.

    The lawsuit against MAHA alleges that MAHA and Defendant Figueroa violated the Consumer Fraud Act by misrepresenting the nature and value of the MAHA program, which MAHA advertises exclusively in Spanish language media and sells in face-to-face meetings in MAHA’ office and at several “retail outlets” in Phoenix and Tucson, including at the office of La Placita. The lawsuit alleges that MAHA salespersons tell potential clients that MAHA can help them obtain specific, favorable mortgage modifications, including lower interest rates and principal reductions. After homeowners pay MAHA nearly $1,900, homeowners discover that the MAHA program is nothing more than a do-it-yourself program, allowing them access to various standardized forms and information on MAHA’s website; forms and information that are available for free on government websites, such as www.makinghomeaffordable.gov. The lawsuit also alleges that MAHA uses dozens of fake consumer testimonials on its website and that MAHA charges its clients a fake sales tax of 9.3%.

    The lawsuit against La Paz Source and La Placita alleges that La Paz Source, LLC was an Arizona LLC who advertised as providing foreclosure consultant services. Consumers have reported that La Paz Source, LLC promised to stop the foreclosure process, obtain loan modifications for its consumers and communicate with lenders/servicers on behalf of its clients. As La Paz Source, LLC, the Defendants allegedly claimed they were authorized to conduct such business in Arizona when they were not duly licensed to conduct their business here. Oftentimes, La Paz Source charged very large upfront fees, which were prohibited by state and federal law, and then failed to provide the mortgage loan modification services required to earn those fees. In some cases, the clients lost their homes in the process.

    In November of 2011, Defendants Beltran and Ramos dissolved La Paz Source, LLC. The same day that the Defendants dissolved La Paz, Beltran and Arturo Gomez Leon started La Placita which also held itself out as being a provider of mortgage loan modification services to Arizona consumers.

    The Defendants deceptively and willfully target the Spanish-speaking community in Arizona to obtain a benefit through the exploitation of the consumers’ Spanish/English language barrier. The Defendants provide contracts written only in English. Many times, the Defendants verbally explain terms of the agreement to consumers, in Spanish, that are in direct contradiction to the written provisions of the contract provided in English.

    The La Paz and La Placita Defendants now claim to have changed their business model to that of a retail outlet for MAHA. The complaint further alleges: the Defendants continue falsely to guarantee consumers that the Defendants’ services will result in foreclosure prevention and a favorable loan modification; the Defendants hold themselves out to the community as experts in mortgage loan modifications and use deceptive means to lure distressed homeowners into parting with hundreds or thousands of dollars, then the Defendants take their money without providing the efficacy, nature, or kind of services for which the consumer bargained; and that the Defendants charge consumers a fee they call a “sales tax,” but those monies are not remitted to the Arizona Department of Revenue. Furthermore, the Defendants represent that they are compliant with state and federal laws when they routinely violate the FTC M.A.R.S rule banning upfront fees for mortgage assistance relief services.

    These cases are being handled by Assistant Attorneys General Cherie Howe and Jeremy Shorbe. The cases are State of Arizona v. Making All Homes Affordable, et al., Maricopa County Superior Court case number CV2012-011000 and State of Arizona v. La Paz Source, LLC et al., Pima County Superior Court number C20124738.

    If you believe you’ve been a victim of any type of consumer fraud, please contact the Arizona Attorney General’s Office Consumer Information & Complaints Unit at (602) 542-5763 / (520) 628-6504 / (800) 352-8431.

    You can also file a consumer complaint online at: https://www.azag.gov/consumer/complaintform.html

    Posted by Shannon Hubbard, AZ Realtor & Computer Guru on August 16, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

    Wells Fargo REO Off Limits to Bank of America Employees?

    Just saw a listing in MLS that says the house is owned by Wells Fargo Bank, but in the remarks it says:

    "Bank of America, N.A. employees and employees' household members (including persons deriving their primary means of financial support from a Bank employee) and business partners of the Bank are prohibited from purchasing this property, whether directly or indirectly."

    That's weird, huh?   Public records also show Wells Fargo as the property owner.  I wonder if the listing agent meant to say that Wells Fargo employees are prohibited from purchasing the property.  Or does Wells Fargo not want Bank of America employees buying Wells Fargo REO properties?

    #TooBigToFail  #ThingsThatMakeYouGoHmmmm

    Posted by Shannon Hubbard, AZ Realtor & Computer Guru on August 16, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

    Friday, November 06, 2009

    They're Back... Zip Codes Come Back to AZ MLS!

    The Zip Codes Are Back!  Thank you nice folks at Arizona Regional MLS (ARMLS®)!!

    Zip codes disappeared from AZ MLS sheets sometime in the past few weeks.  I don't know for sure when the zip codes returned, but I noticed it yesterday, (ironically) right after I finished talking on the phone with another real estate agent who mentioned the missing zip codes!  He was giving me an address and didn't have the zip code because it wasn't on his MLS printout!  But now I'm happy to say that MLS looks like this again...

    Zip Codes Back on AZ MLS! 

    Just to be sure, I looked up some of my old MLS printouts that had no zip codes, and MLS shows all their zip codes now.  So thank you again ARMLS®!!

    Visit Shannon Hubbard's Home Page     Written By: Shannon Hubbard
    Realtor®-Investor

    Great American Realty, Inc.

    Cell: (480) 695-6672
    Email me

    Posted by Shannon Hubbard, AZ Realtor & Computer Guru on November 6, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (10) | TrackBack

    Thursday, October 29, 2009

    Zip Codes Missing from Arizona MLS

    Dear nice folks at Arizona Regional MLS (ARMLS®),

    What happened to the zip code?  It used to be prominently displayed at the very top of the MLS printout (after the city & state where it belongs!).  It looked like this...

    Zip Code on AZ MLS 

    But the zip code is not there anymore, and I can't find it listed anywhere else on the MLS printout either.  Here's how it looks now...

    Zip Code missing from AZ MLS 

    Did you intentionally remove the zip code, and if so, why on earth would you do this?  If not, when will the zip code be returned to it's proper location?

    It just disappeared in the past couple of weeks, so hopefully it won't be too hard for you to find it.  I know you're usually very good about informing Realtors® when you make changes to MLS.  So perhaps you did send out an email informing Realtors® the zip code would be disappearing soon.  Unfortunately, I didn't get the memo.  So here I sit wondering, what the heck happened to the zip codes?

    Please help.  Thank you!

    Visit Shannon Hubbard's Home Page     Written By: Shannon Hubbard
    Realtor®-Investor

    Great American Realty, Inc.

    Cell: (480) 695-6672
    Email me

    Posted by Shannon Hubbard, AZ Realtor & Computer Guru on October 29, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

    Real Estate Scam Involving Foreclosures, Short Sales & Vacant Homes For Sale

    Here's a recent "Scam Alert"sent out by ARMLS®.  Realtors® and anybody who owns a vacant home should beware:

    SCAM ALERT: Check Your Vacant Listings
     
    A recent scam reported to ARMLS® involves tenants moving into a pending short sale listing. The surprised listing agent contacted the owner who had not rented the property to anyone. The tenants (two women with two children) were physically moving in and had turned on utilities in their name. The sign and the lock box were removed, and all locks were re-keyed. 

    The tenants responded to a For Rent sign in the yard. They gave someone $1,800 as rent and signed a lease. While the short sale was able to close, the unfortunate victims of this scam were out $1,800 with no place to live.
     
    This down economy encourages some people to take advantage of others.  Listing agents should check their vacant listings regularly and provide neighbors their contact information in case they observe any suspicious activity.

    So sellers - keep an eye on your vacant homes and/or ask your neighbors to watch for suspicious activity.  Realtors® - check your vacant listings.  And renters - verify the owner/history of the property you're renting, and check out your potential landlord!

    Visit Shannon Hubbard's Home Page     Written By: Shannon Hubbard
    Realtor®-Investor

    Great American Realty, Inc.

    Cell: (480) 695-6672
    Email me

    Posted by Shannon Hubbard, AZ Realtor & Computer Guru on October 29, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (13) | TrackBack

    Monday, October 19, 2009

    Extending or Expanding Tax Credit for First Time Homebuyers: Good for the Real Estate Market?

    Knowing that I'm a Realtor® and that much of my income is dependant upon the real estate market, you might be surprised as you read my opinion on extending and/or expanding the Homebuyer Tax Credit.  For starters, I'll say that I believe the free market can almost always solve problems better without government involvement.  Unfortunately, the real estate market has not been allowed to operate without government interference for some time.  I'll even go one step further and say that government interference caused the real estate market bubble and resulting crash, and the same idiots who created the problem should not be trusted to fix it.

    Politicians, who wanted to buy votes by forcing banks to give loans to people who could not afford to pay them back, are the primary cause of the real estate bubble and ultimate crash (which I believe also caused the current recession).  This effort was driven by bleeding-heart liberal Democrats, but many of the so-called conservative Republicans shamefully went along with it for many years and many administrations.  We all know what happens when banks are forced to lend money to people who can't afford to pay it back... eventually they don't pay it back and the banks lose money.  The banks then have to make up these losses somewhere else: either by charging good customers more, or by (the new trend of) getting billions in bailout dollars from taxpayers.  So either way, hard-working taxpayers lose when government forces businesses to make bad bets.

    But instead of recognizing that government is the problem, our brilliant bureaucrats instantly (and without any real thought) decided that more government is the answer.  So they offered $8,000 refundable tax credits (aka govt handouts) aimed at first time homebuyers who otherwise could not afford to buy a house.  HELLO?  These are the people whose loans are currently foreclosing at astronomical rates.  Incentivizing people who can't really afford a house into buying one anyway isn't going to fix the real estate market or the banking situation.  This is what caused the problem!  Repeating the same mistake will only prolong the agony and further stress the financial institutions that finance these properties.  Not to mention the fact that it's inherently unfair to ask some taxpayers to pay higher taxes so the government can give their money to others for a down-payment on a new house they can't really afford.  And then add insult to injury by forcing those same taxpayers to bail out the banks when these loans foreclose, as if it were not foreseeable (right!).

    So like cash-for-clunkers, I believe the First Time Homebuyer Tax Credit was a stupid idea, and therefore extending or expanding it will ultimately do more harm than good to the real estate market.  It may cause a short-lived spike in sales like cash-for-clunkers did (at the cost of future sales, by the way).  But do we really want manic ups and downs in the real estate market, or do we want a slower but sustainable growth?  I think anyone who owns real estate or works in the real estate industry would agree that a slow, sustained growth is better for all of us in the long run.  Some lawmakers and various Realtor® associations are pushing to increase the tax credit to $15,000 and extend it to more than just first time homebuyers, with a higher limit on the buyer's income.  To me, this is just the same dumb idea with longer lines of people taking the handout, and with a much higher price tag.

    So when will the real estate market start to recover if government stops interfering?  It's already started to recover, in Arizona at least.  Keep in mind that national statistics quoted in the news may not be applicable to Arizona's real estate market.  Real estate is local.  Arizona was one of the first and hardest hit areas of the country when the real estate bubble started to burst (for lack of a better term!).  And I think Arizona was also one of the first to start recovering, because Arizona real estate prices were driven down faster and lower than other areas.  And lower prices is what makes buyers start coming out.

    Don't get me wrong, the Arizona real estate market is not all sunshine and lolli-pops.  Not at all.  There are still tough times ahead, but people are buying despite the fact that banks aren't really lending like they should be (I guess it's more profitable for banks not to lend, and suck up taxpayer bailouts instead!).  But if the government just stays out of the way, the market will slowly recover on its own - without unnecessary, artificial government stimulation that really just wastes billions in taxpayer's money.

    Visit Shannon Hubbard's Home Page     Written By: Shannon Hubbard
    Realtor®-Investor

    Great American Realty, Inc.

    Cell: (480) 695-6672
    Email me

    Posted by Shannon Hubbard, AZ Realtor & Computer Guru on October 19, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (8)

    Is the Phoenix, Arizona Real Estate Market Recovering?

    Here's a snapshot of the current Phoenix metro area real estate market, as I see it:

    At the end of last year, the real estate market in the Phoenix metropolitan area started to pick up...  not because of any government program, but because the free market works.  When prices came down to a certain level, the investors came out to play.  Some of those who were sitting on the sidelines waiting decided it was time.  And people started buying again... not in huge droves like a few years back when people were fighting each other for houses.  But then again, who wants that, really?  (I was taught that slow and steady wins the race!).

    Since then, I've seen a steady flow of buyers into the market, and many banks/real estate agents are even creating bidding wars again.  Of course, these bidding wars are driven by totally fabricated demand.  The bank has a real estate agent list the house for a super low price to attract multiple offers.  Then instead of rejecting any of the offers, they entice all of the propsective buyers into a bidding war and tell them to make their "highest and best offer".  None of the buyers know what the other bids are, so they often times end up bidding higher than they should because they get sucked into the emotion of 'wanting to win the bid' rather than rationally determining what the house is worth without that emotion present.  I always tell buyers to avoid bidding situations, even in a sellers market.  But especially in the current buyer's market... there are still way too many houses available for sale right now to get into a bidding war.  Go find a seller who appreciates your offer more and is willing to negotiate under your terms.  In a buyer's market, the buyer should feel like they're driving the terms of the deal, not the seller.

    But realize that Arizona's residential real estate market still faces significant foreclosures, and this will continue for some time.  Supply is good for buyers and you shouldn't let uncertainty scare you away from the market if you're buying an owner-occupied home that you plan to keep for at least 3-5 years.  However, I would advise inexperienced investors to be very careful buying Arizona real estate right now, especially if you plan to do a short-term flip.  There's money to be made, but you can also lose a bunch so just know what you're doing.

    In my opinion, Arizona's real estate market is recovering, but is not out of the woods yet.  The biggest danger to this recovery (other than government interference) is the commercial real estate market.  I'm not sure why nobody is talking about it, but the commercial market could create huge problems in the coming years, especially if banking problems are not addressed.  Commercial real estate market trends lag the residential market, and I don't think we've even started to see the real impact of the commercial market yet.  Here's why: Many commerical real estate mortgages are 5-year or 10-year interest-only loans with balloon payments due at the end of the term.  So as those commercial loans made at the height of the real estate bubble start to come due (as they currently are), the property owner (probably a small business owner) will have only a few choices.  They either have to pay off the entire balance, which is unlikely for most businesses since they're probably already struggling to make ends meet.  Or they'll have to re-finance the loan, which is also unlikely because 1) property values are much lower now and the property is probably not worth the loan amount anymore, and 2) lending standards are tighter and commercial loans are very hard to get.  So if these loans can't be re-financed or paid off, the only other option is to sell the property before the loan is due.  Many property owners will wait too long, not realizing how long it takes to sell a commercial property in today's market and will consequently face foreclosure.  For this reason, I believe the commercial market could be the next big real estate crisis.

    Of course, I don't have a crystal ball, and nobody really knows for sure what tomorrow will bring.  Everybody with an opinion on the future of the real estate market is really just guessing :)  So my advice is guess carefully, and as always, buyer beware!

    Visit Shannon Hubbard's Home Page     Written By: Shannon Hubbard
    Realtor®-Investor

    Great American Realty, Inc.

    Cell: (480) 695-6672
    Email me

    Posted by Shannon Hubbard, AZ Realtor & Computer Guru on October 19, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (5) | TrackBack

    Wednesday, July 15, 2009

    Wells Fargo Sues Itself In Mortgage Foreclosure Case

    Okay, just when you thought things in the mortgage industry couldn't get any more insane... Wells Fargo files a lawsuit against itself.  That's right, Wells Fargo Bank NA v. Wells Fargo Bank NA.

    Apparently, the lawsuit is related to a mortgage foreclosure case in Hillsborough County, Florida.  Wells Fargo spokesman, Kevin Waetke reportedly said, "The primary reason is to clear title and ownership interest in a property to prepare it for sale".

    Personally, I've never found it necessary to sue myself in order to prepare a property for sale.  But then I've also never been dumb enough to give both a first mortgage and second mortgage to the same person on the same house either.  So I guess it makes perfect sense if you're a "too big to fail" lending institution like Wells Fargo.  You know, the kind where the right hand doesn't know what the left hand is doing so they end up hiring lawyers to sue themselves, and then have to hire lawyers to defend themselves too.  Who knows, it might be a brilliant legal strategy because even if Wells Fargo loses, they also win!  But then even if they win, they also lose. 

    The biggest losers here are the taxpayers who bailed this company out thinking it was "too big to fail".  Sometimes stupidity needs to be allowed to fail.  If Wells Fargo has nothing better to do with the BILLIONS of taxpayer dollars they received under the recent government bailout (TARP), why don't they just pay it all back?


    Visit Shannon Hubbard's Home Page     Written By: Shannon Hubbard
    Realtor®-Investor

    Great American Realty, Inc.

    Cell: (480) 695-6672
    Email me

    Posted by Shannon Hubbard, AZ Realtor & Computer Guru on July 15, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (17)

    Monday, July 06, 2009

    Did your AZ Representative Help Defeat the Anti-Sanctuary City Bill?

    Before adjourning July 1, the Arizona House defeated a bill (HB 2280) by Senator Russell Pearce that would have cracked down on pro-illegal alien “sanctuary” laws and aided in immigration enforcement by expanding the state’s trespassing law. While the Senate approved the bill 16-11, the House was five votes short of the 31 needed for passage.

    Democratic politicians usually oppose illegal immigration enforcement, as they need the pro-illegal money and votes to get re-elected.  But three Republicans also opposed this bill even though the State Republican Party unanimously passed a resolution supporting it and numerous law enforcement organizations endorsed it (at least those who haven’t had long-standing ties with open-borders groups and cheap-labor business lobbyists).  The 3 Republicans and 12 Democrats who opposed this bill were:

    What's really disturbing is that 19 members of the House (listed below) did not even vote on the bill at all.  Shame on them.  I was told the six Republicans listed below physically left the Capitol building so they didn’t have to go on record as opposing HB 2280 (sadly, my Representative was among them):

    Is this really what we pay our elected officials to do... play both sides of the aisle and hide their true beliefs so nobody knows what they support or oppose?  I know I didn't vote for that.  I expect my elected representatives to help Americans, not illegal immigrants.  And no, I'm not a racist although the pro-illegal immigration crowd will say anyone who wants our immigration laws enforced must be a racist (so go ahead and send the emails anyway - my delete key is ready!).  I simply want our laws to be respected by all.  You and I must obey the law or pay the consequences.  Why are illegals getting a free pass at our expense?  Our immigration laws have been ignored for long enough, and selective enforcement of some laws results in lack of respect for all laws.  If all laws are not enforced, how do you know which ones they're really serious about?

    So what does this have to do with real estate?  PEOPLE DON'T WANT TO LIVE IN SANCTUARY CITIES.  Eliminating sanctuary city policies will not only aid law enforcement and make our cities safer, but this bill will also alleviate some of our financial problems.  Sanctuary cities are plagued with increased costs and decreased quality of education, healthcare, law enforcement and all other social services.  Sound familiar?

    Our current budget mess reminds us that Arizona can't even afford the services it's currently providing.  So do we raise taxes, reduce services & quality of services provided to legal residents, or eliminate services for those who are here illegally mooching off the rest of us?  Seems kind of like a no-brainer to me, especially considering that many legal Arizona residents are currently unemployed and in need of assistance.  But then I'm just a lowly taxpayer so I don't have all that special "State Representative" knowledge that's required to make such important decisions with other people's money.

    The defeat of this bill means that sanctuary policies, like those in Mesa and other Valley cities, will continue to:

    • Protect criminal illegals from deportation
    • Allow illegals to take benefits intended for needy Arizona residents
    • Allow illegals to take jobs that should go to legal Arizona residents

    When public assistance agencies are prevented from inquiring about an applicant's immigration status, benefits are distributed to ineligible illegal aliens.  Sanctuary policies directly violate Federal law and make it easier for illegal aliens, including criminal aliens, to live undetected in Arizona. How many citizens, including police officers, have to die or be maimed before we decide to enforce our immigration laws?

    ATTENTION STATE LAWMAKERS:  If you oppose a bill, at least have the backbone to stand up and say so.  Otherwise, don't ask for my vote next time you run for re-election... because I will show up to vote against you (and I'll encourage everyone I know to do the same).  And by the way, illegal immigrants don't vote, but angry American citizens do.

    If your AZ Representative is listed above, be sure to email them and let them know how you feel about their vote (or lack thereof) on this issue.  Just click the email address of your Representative to send a pre-written letter, or edit the email to say whatever you'd like.  Click here to look up your Representative.

    Visit Shannon Hubbard's Home Page     Written By: Shannon Hubbard
    Realtor®-Investor

    Great American Realty, Inc.

    Cell: (480) 695-6672
    Email me

    Posted by Shannon Hubbard, AZ Realtor & Computer Guru on July 6, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (7)

    Sunday, July 05, 2009

    AWOL Blogger Returns to BlogArizona - Happy 4th of July!

    I know I haven't blogged forever and a day, so I guess it's time again!  How could I have stayed away so long with so much to blog about lately?  Honestly, I've been overwhelmed with work and life in general.  Since the end of last year, the real estate & home inspection business have kept me working 12+ hour days, 7 days a week.  Funny how the free markets actually work if the government stops interfering long enough to allow it.  When AZ real estate prices came down low enough (last year), the buyers started to come out and inventory has come down significantly now.  No, it wasn't the stimulus or the tax credit - it was lower prices (a function of supply and demand, not government intervention).

    For those of you who have emailed and left comments telling me to update BlogArizona... thanks!  Even after months of not blogging, BlogArizona has still been visited by thousands of loyal readers and the search engines still seem to like us quite a bit.  In fact, I still rank high enough to command attention from the bubble bursting crowd (what an honor!).  After being quoted in this LA Times article by Nicholas Riccardi (which was also picked up by the Chicago Tribune, etc), I was recently bashed by Boom2Bust because I wasn't negative enough when discussing the Arizona real estate market.  Okay, in all fairness, Boom2Bust was actually criticizing the use of Arizona real estate professionals as sources for the article... an article which happened to be about the Arizona real estate market (need I say duh???).  Here's what Boom2Bust says about the Chicago Tribune article...

    "Nicholas Riccardi wrote on June 7:

    Phoenix’s housing bust has turned into a quasi-boom, a sign that its market might have hit bottom and a preview of what a housing recovery could look like.

    More homes are selling than at any time since 2006. Prices are slowly stabilizing. Buyers again are in bidding wars — only this time over foreclosed houses selling at deep discounts rather than ranch homes listing for vast sums.

    Riccardi’s sources? Individuals who could stand to gain from a rebound in the Phoenix housing market. From the piece:

    “The free market is at work,” said Shannon Hubbard, a real estate agent and blogger. “Prices got driven down so much that people said, ‘I’m going to come out and play.’ “

    Hubbard writes on BlogArizona.com:

    I’m a Realtor-Investor, maintaining an active real estate license with Great American Realty, Inc. I’m also Co-owner of Homewerx Home Inspections, and Owner of BlogArizona.com."

    There were a few other AZ real estate professionals quoted, and Boom2Bust concluded/implied that real estate agents just say good things about the real estate market so they can make money.  So who should Mr. Riccardi have called to interview for his article about the Arizona real estate market... some doctors in Nicaragua?  Everything stated in the article was true, and the sources for the information were fully and accurately disclosed - so what's the problem?  Boom2Bust goes on to give alternate sources of information about the Arizona housing market, to balance the opinions of us greedy real estate professionals who were quoted...

    "So, is there another side to the Phoenix housing story? Well, consider the following from Bloomberg’s Kathleen Howley and Erik Schatzker today:

    U.S. home prices may continue to tumble for years, according to economist and Yale University professor Robert J. Shiller.

    “Our sense that housing is a wonderful investment is really damaged now,” Shiller said in an interview with Bloomberg Television today…

    The Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller national index of home prices, named after the professor, has fallen 32 percent from a high in the second quarter of 2006."

    Note that Boom2Bust uses only national statistics and sources to talk about the Arizona real estate market.  Should we tell Boom2Bust that real estate is local?  The national numbers mean nothing to us here in Arizona, even if those numbers come from Yale scholars (Yale isn't even in Arizona!).  So Boom2Bust would prefer generic, national sources rather than first hand information from people in the AZ trenches?  The Arizona real estate market was among the hardest hit and therefore the first to start the recovery (when prices got low enough).  Who do you think is more likely to know when that recovery has started... a Yale professor or an Arizona Realtor?

    Okay... considering I haven't blogged in many months, I guess I should just feel loved since I'm still being contacted for interviews by major newspapers and bashed by bubble bloggers.  Never a dull moment.  But don't worry, I'll be back for more much sooner this time.  Hope you enjoyed your 4th of July weekend!

    Visit Shannon Hubbard's Home Page     Written By: Shannon Hubbard
    Realtor®-Investor

    Great American Realty, Inc.

    Cell: (480) 695-6672
    Email me

    Posted by BlogArizona BlogMaster on July 5, 2009 | Permalink | Comments (8)

           

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